Peru vs Chile

Peru vs Chile : Duelo de Semifinal por la Copa America 2019 entre Peru vs Chile (El Clásico del Pacifico) que selección de Sudamerica avanzará a la final In the War of the Pacific (1879-83), Peru vs Chile and Bolivia to win its present northern regions. In the 1880s, the Chilean central government gained Peru vs Chile se miden este miércoles en el Arena do Gremio para definir a la Selección que chocará ante Brasil en la final de la Copa América

RIO DE JANEIRO — The Gods of Football gifted us two bona fide rivalries in the Copa America semifinals.

Headlining is Brazil vs. Argentina (Tuesday, 8:30 p.m. ET; ESPN+), the “SuperClasico de las Americas” and, in terms of pedigree, one of the few international matchups that lives up to the hype, usually in terms of quality and almost always in terms of incident.

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But the “Pacific derby” — Chile vs. Peru (Wednesday, 8:30 p.m. ET; ESPN+) — is an intriguing understudy, rich in a rivalry that often transcends football and not just over the paternity of the “Pisco Sour.”

Indeed, one of the twists is that no matter what happens, Chile and Peru are playing with house money, whereas Brazil and Argentina are pretty much assured inquests, pulling of hair and gnashing of teeth if they stumble at this hurdle.

Let’s start with the big one. Brazil and Argentina have faced off for more than 100 years and reached 12 World Cup finals between them, winning seven. They have produced three unquestioned GOAT candidates — Pele, Diego Maradona and Lionel Messi — spawned oodles of sociological treaties about the importance of futbol/futebol to their national psyches and generally have been the yin to each other’s yang.

In 105 previous meetings, there have been 41 wins for Brazil, with 38 for Argentina and 26 draws. If you discount friendlies, then Argentina are ahead, 18 to 17.

Not that too many encounters have been very friendly; from pitch invasions (1925), to Brazil walking off (1937), to Argentina walking off and Brazil scoring the winning penalty into an empty goal (1939), to police invading the pitch to stop the teams fighting (1946), to the “Battle of Rosario” (1978), to Maradona’s horror tackle and red card at the World Cup (1982), to Maradona’s genius right-footed pass for Claudio Caniggia and subsequent “holy water” controversy (1990), to five players getting sent off in the Copa America (1991) to Tulio’s “hand of the devil” goal (1995), this rivalry has had plenty of controversy.

The last time they squared off in the Copa America was back in the 2007 final. Twelve years later, two of the protagonists are still around: Dani Alves, who came on and scored in a 3-0 Brazil win, and Messi, who had just turned 20 at the time.

Some reckon Tuesday’s clash will be different, since many players are teammates in their day jobs. Messi is at Barcelona with Philippe Coutinho and Arthur. Gabriel Jesus lines up with Nicolas Otamendi and Sergio Aguero at Manchester City. Leandro Paredes and Angel Di Maria share a dressing room with Marquinhos; and Thiago Silva and Dani Alves at Paris Saint-Germain. Paulo Dybala and Alex Sandro break bread at Juventus.

Yeah, right. And the Easter Bunny loves hiding those eggs …

The fact is, globalization, commercialization and, yeah, cold hard cash might have turned these guys into colleagues and maybe even friends, but this is different. This is international football. This is playing for your country.

And the usual pressure and stakes are ratcheted up further by circumstances. Brazil are still scarred by the aftereffects of the Mineirazo, the 7-1 World Cup semifinal defeat against Germany in 2014 that induced a one-way ticket to “The Twilight Zone.” (Yes, they return to the scene of the crime for this game.)

It will take time to expiate, and another major trophy might accelerate the process, but the 2015 Copa America went off the rails when Neymar was banned and ended with a penalty shootout exit against Paraguay in the quarterfinals. A year later, Brazil failed to get out of their Copa America Centenario group.

Hopes were high for a fresh start at World Cup in Russia and plenty jumped on the Tite bandwagon, only for it to be derailed by Roberto Martinez and Belgium in the last eight. It is 12 years and counting since the Selecao’s last major tournament win, not including a pair of Confederations Cup triumphs in 2009 and 2013.

There is still plenty of faith in Tite, and the major mitigating factor of Neymar’s absence this time around weighs heavily in a rational assessment of the tournament. But this is Brazil and this is home soil, which means reason will quickly go through the power shredder should things go awry against the old enemy.

Brazil vs. Argentina would be a fitting final, but only one team will advance in Belo Horizonte on Tuesday. Getty
For Argentina, the pressure is myriad. First, there is the Messi issue. His detractors never miss the opportunity to point out his lack of trophies in an Albiceleste shirt, just as his supporters point to his four finals — three in the Copa America, one in the World Cup — and the fact that his side were twice beaten on penalties and once in extra time.

Knocking this eternal — and, frankly, puerile — debate on the head once and for all would be nice, particularly because, having turned 32 last week, Messi is not getting any younger. The idea that Argentina have failed to grab any silverware in nine attempts with one of the greatest players in history is an indictment of one of the game’s traditional powers.

More broadly, there are other stains to wipe away, starting with the memory of Russia. It was not just the shambles at the tournament itself, where Argentina scraped through the group stage only to be beaten by France, but the embarrassingly chaotic qualifying campaign, which featured three managers and last-ditch turnarounds.

Moreover, there are the continuing difficulties of the Argentine FA (which, lest we forget, led Messi to announce his international retirement in 2016) and the fact that manager Lionel Scaloni has an interim contract that expires the moment Argentina are eliminated from this tournament.

Scaloni was charged with limiting “Messi dependency” and putting together a rational framework. After fits and starts in the group stage — marked by copious changes in system and personnel — he seems to have found some sort of balance in a 4-3-1-2 with Rodrigo De Paul in midfield, Messi in the hole and Lautaro Martinez alongside Aguero up front. It did the job against Venezuela, but it feels fragile enough that it could be blown away should old insecurities crawl back in.

– Vickery: Brazil vs. Argentina can make up for dull quarterfinals
– Copa America coverage index | Full fixtures schedule

Meanwhile, Chile and Peru have effectively already won their respective Copa Americas. Chile are two-time defending champions dreaming of a three-peat, but the landscape is different and not just because they are in Brazil’s house (they hosted in 2015 and the Centenario was on “neutral” territory in the United States).

Eight of the starting XI that knocked out Colombia in the quarterfinal are in their thirties, and another, Edu Vargas, turns 30 in November. The high-energy, flat-out, run-and-gun style that helped deliver those two titles is no longer an option, not for 90 minutes anyway.

As such, Chile must pick their spots. And with Alexis Sanchez coming off a nightmare campaign at club level — he has scored as many goals (two) in four games at this tournament as he did in 27 appearances for Manchester United last season — few expected them to get this far.

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But Reinaldo Rueda’s crew will start as favourites on Wednesday, mainly because Peru were not just unfancied before a ball was kicked, but due to the fact they have been lackluster in reaching the semifinals. Their only win was a comeback victory over Bolivia; they were hammered 5-0 by Brazil, and in the previous round, they survived three disallowed goals and failed to get a shot on target before ousting Uruguay on penalties.

“From a mental perspective, we’re in good shape,” Peru coach Ricardo Gareca said after that win. “Of course, when it comes to the footballing side, there’s room for improvement.”

Maybe so, but when margins are slim, every inch is contested and penalty kicks and intestinal fortitude often come into play; that “mental strength” to which he alluded could be key. It applies whether you are playing nearly pressure-free, such as Chile and Peru, or have the weight of the world on your shoulders, like Brazil and Argentina.

Chile vs Peru

Chile vs Peru: Holders Chile vs Peru in the 2019 Copa America semi-final on Wednesday. Chile vs Peru La Roja are striving towards a third successive Copa title after defeating Colombia 5-4 on penalties following a goalless draw over 90 minutes in the quarter-finalsThe Manchester United forward scored THE Copa America has reached the final four as Chile and Peru face-off for a place in the final.

The Copa America semi-final between Brazil and Argentina is not the only one filled with history.

Chile vs. Peru on Wednesday doesn’t carry the same sporting rivalry as Brazil vs. Argentina, but it brings together two nations with off-the-field quarrels dating to the 19th Century.

Chile and Peru fought in the War of the Pacific from 1879-84, with Chile coming out victorious against a Peru-Bolivia alliance and taking over some key land with access to the Pacific Ocean.

“There’s some added rivalry,” Peru striker Paolo Guerrero said. “Chile is our historic rival.”

Despite a mostly peaceful relationship between the nations these days, tensions can still be felt.

In one of the last matches between them, in qualifying for the 2018 World Cup in Lima, Peruvian fans booed Chile’s national anthem. After a 4-3 victory, Chile left a message in the changing room calling for respect.

In the last round of the qualifiers, Chile missed out on the World Cup because of a draw between Peru and Colombia in a match dubbed the “Pacto de Lima” because the result benefited both nations, to Chile’s detriment.

“It’s a clasico that goes beyond football. There’s a lot of rivalry with the Chileans,” Peru defender Miguel Trauco said. “We know what this clasico means, so we will give our best, but in the end it’s only football. We shouldn’t mix things.”

Historically, Chile has gotten the better of Peru in the “Clasico del Pacifico,” winning 44 of the 80 matches. In official competitions, Chile has won seven of the last eight, including in the semi-finals of the 2015 Copa America.

Peru, which last year made its first World Cup appearance in nearly four decades, is playing in the semi-finals of the Copa America for the third time in the last four tournaments, but it hasn’t made it to the final – or won the title – since 1975.

Women’s World Cup 2019 Live

Women’s World Cup 2019: Megan Rapinoe handed the United States a fitness boost by training the morning after she missed their Women’s World Cup semi-final win over England.

The 33-year-old forward, who has scored five times in France, missed Tuesday’s 2-1 victory over the Lionesses in Lyon with a “slight” hamstring strain.

Rapinoe said after the game she expected to be fit to feature in Sunday’s final – when USA will face either Netherlands or Sweden – and there was an encouraging sign on Wednesday as she trained with those members of Jill Ellis’ squad who did not start on Tuesday.

In the session open to the media, Rapinoe was involved in both the stretching and jogging exercises having only watched on while the rest of USA’s squad warmed up before their game on Tuesday.The moment the final whistle went in England’s 2-1 semi-final defeat by the USA, Phil Neville’s thoughts immediately turned to how to win on Saturday. Yet his players emerged through the tunnel crestfallen, having left everything they had on the pitch, and will need time before they recover mentally for the match for third place.

This, however, is to their credit, having matched the USA in terms of athleticism and physicality for much of the game. Now, England will assess how to match their own achievements at Canada 2015 to ensure they return home with a medal.

The Lionesses battled to contain their nerves in the early part of the game, while USA marauded forward, taking an early lead as all knew they were capable of. The resilience, tenacity and authority England had shown throughout the World Cup were partly eclipsed against the backdrop of this enormous occasion, while a disallowed goal, a saved penalty and a red card contributed to this deflating, and all too familiar story of semi-final defeat.

“We will have to allow 24 to 48 hours for this to sink in and for them to get over this,” Neville said after the game. “Nothing I say can make them feel better. We have to go to Nice and we have to go again, and that will tell me a lot about what my players are about.

“I can’t say to my players at the end, ‘unlucky’, neither can I say that I’m proud of them, that they left their hearts on the pitch. That’s white noise to them because they wanted to win.”

However, England have shown growth despite suffering a similar fate four years ago. Neville however claimed to have shelved the disappointment immediately, clicking into auto-pilot as the guardian of England’s future success. “As soon as the whistle went, my first thought was. ‘how do we win on Saturday?’,” he said.

The mental preparation for the play-off will be half the battle, as England revive themselves to finish their World Cup adventure on a high. The depth in their squad will provide freshness, while they will concentrate on retaining possession, which has been a priority in training for months. They refused to lie down against the holders, and they will have to show that same fight in order to retain the bronze.

“You lose, but I thought the way we lost was exactly the way I wanted to play,” Neville continued. “I said, win or lose, I want us to play a certain style. The courage they had to play football, to keep going and to battle was outstanding. We have no regrets, absolutely no regrets. We came here to the World Cup and gave it everything we have. I don’t want to see tears. There should be smiles. We’ve had the best 46 days of our lives. We didn’t want it to end, and it hasn’t ended yet.”

Netherlands vs Sweden Live

Netherlands vs Sweden Live: FIFA Women’s World Cup 2019 Cup Start Time TV Channel. The Netherlands and Sweden face off in the semifinal of the 2019 Women’s World Cup as both teams look to surprise their respective critics and secure their place in the final, as reported by CBS Sports.

In a matchup between a veteran of the tournament and a relative newcomer, Sweden makes their fourth appearance in the semifinal out of eight total appearances in the World Cup, while this marks the first time the Netherlands have made it this far in the tournament. But in the international game, history doesn’t mean too much, and the Dutch women bring their FIFA ranking of eighth in the world against the ninth-ranked Swedes in a match considered by many to be too close to call.

While the Netherlands’ time as one of the premier nations on the global stage has been brief, there is no doubt that it has been impactful as the Dutch women look to secure their second consecutive international trophy on the back of their victory in the 2017 Women’s Euros. The Netherlands have secured some impressive results on their way to the semifinal, ending the Japanese women’s quest for a third consecutive World Cup final in the Round of 16 before putting to rest the underdog run of Italy with a 2-0 victory, which saw them outshoot the Italian women 21-6 with goals from Vivianne Miedema and Stefanie van der Gragt.

The Dutch attack has come alive as the tournament has gone on, having scored either two or three goals in every game since their opener against New Zealand, with Miedema’s three goals leading the way followed by fellow forward Lieke Martens’ two. The overwhelming attack has been a theme of the Netherlands’ 2019, as they have outscored teams 25-8 over 12 matches.

However, Sweden holds the advantage in head-to-head matchups, winning 10 of 21, with six draws and five defeats. While the Dutch have made their name with scoring, Sweden brings their dominant defense into the semifinal, having allowed 19 goals in their last 16 games. Their 2019 form sees them allowing nine goals in 12 matches, with more than half of those goals being allowed to the two top-ranked teams in the world: the United States and Germany.

While they have made their name for their defense, Sweden proved their attacking ability in their quarterfinal upset of Germany, pulling off an incredible come-from-behind victory over the Germans to progress 2-1. In their five World Cup matches, Sweden has scored 10 goals spread out among eight different goalscorers.

Sweden vs Netherlands Live

Netherlands vs Sweden Live: FIFA Women’s World Cup 2019 Cup Start Time TV Channel. The Netherlands and Sweden face off in the semifinal of the 2019 Women’s World Cup as both teams look to surprise their respective critics and secure their place in the final, as reported by CBS Sports.

In a matchup between a veteran of the tournament and a relative newcomer, Sweden makes their fourth appearance in the semifinal out of eight total appearances in the World Cup, while this marks the first time the Netherlands have made it this far in the tournament. But in the international game, history doesn’t mean too much, and the Dutch women bring their FIFA ranking of eighth in the world against the ninth-ranked Swedes in a match considered by many to be too close to call.

While the Netherlands’ time as one of the premier nations on the global stage has been brief, there is no doubt that it has been impactful as the Dutch women look to secure their second consecutive international trophy on the back of their victory in the 2017 Women’s Euros. The Netherlands have secured some impressive results on their way to the semifinal, ending the Japanese women’s quest for a third consecutive World Cup final in the Round of 16 before putting to rest the underdog run of Italy with a 2-0 victory, which saw them outshoot the Italian women 21-6 with goals from Vivianne Miedema and Stefanie van der Gragt.

The Dutch attack has come alive as the tournament has gone on, having scored either two or three goals in every game since their opener against New Zealand, with Miedema’s three goals leading the way followed by fellow forward Lieke Martens’ two. The overwhelming attack has been a theme of the Netherlands’ 2019, as they have outscored teams 25-8 over 12 matches.

However, Sweden holds the advantage in head-to-head matchups, winning 10 of 21, with six draws and five defeats. While the Dutch have made their name with scoring, Sweden brings their dominant defense into the semifinal, having allowed 19 goals in their last 16 games. Their 2019 form sees them allowing nine goals in 12 matches, with more than half of those goals being allowed to the two top-ranked teams in the world: the United States and Germany.

While they have made their name for their defense, Sweden proved their attacking ability in their quarterfinal upset of Germany, pulling off an incredible come-from-behind victory over the Germans to progress 2-1. In their five World Cup matches, Sweden has scored 10 goals spread out among eight different goalscorers.

Watch Netherlands vs Sweden Online

Watch Netherlands vs Sweden Online: Defending European champions the Netherlands play Sweden on Wednesday in Lyon in the second semifinal of the Women’s World Cup. There has been drama and controversy at the 2019 Women’s World Cup but up until the last game in the quarterfinals we hadn’t seen a major upset. The Soccerbot is up 2000 percent and just locked in picks for Wednesday’s Sweden vs. Netherlands game.

Netherlands and Sweden meet on Wednesday night for a place in the Women’s World Cup Final.

The Oranje – also known as Leeuwinnen (the Lionesses) – are the reigning European champions after beating Denmark in the 2017 final, and have the knockout pedigree to go all the way on the global stage.

As for Sweden, the Blågult (The Blue and Yellow) have not lifted silverware since Euro ’84, but Peter Gerhardsson’s side will be confident of an upset having shocked Germany in the quarters.

Netherlands and Sweden now know that holders USA await in the July 7 final in Lyon following a dramatic 2-1 win over Phil Neville’s Lionesses in Lyon on Tuesday night.

Netherlands made light work of Italy in the quarters, and with both goals in the 2-0 win coming from headers, the Dutch will fancy their chances from a set-piece if this turns into another tight contest.

Sweden shocked Germany with a 2-1 comeback with in the last eight, and the manner in which they held on to withstand a late onslaught may give them momentum in terms of mentality heading into this semi-final.

Still, the presence of Lieke Mertens and in-form Vivianne Miedema should be enough to see the Oranje into the final.

Fridolina Rolfö is suspended for Sweden after picking up another booking against Germany, meaning Lina Hurtig will likely replace her.

Netherlands have no fresh injury concerns, with Lieke Martens returning against Italy following an injury scare after injuring her foot during goal celebrations.

Netherlands XI: Van Veenendaal; Van Lunteren, Van der Gragt, Janssen, Van Dongen; Groenen, Spitse, Van de Donk; Van de Sande, Miedema, Martens

BBC Sport has live coverage of every match on television, via the red button and through the BBC Sport website.

The competition’s opener will be broadcast live on BBC One with live coverage beginning from 7:30pm, and streamed online via the BBC iPlayer.

There has been drama and controversy at the 2019 Women’s World Cup but up until the last game in the quarterfinals we hadn’t seen a major upset.

That changed with Sweden’s 2-1 win over 2nd favorites, Germany. Based on FIFA rankings there may not be all that much between the two countries – Germany 2nd, and Sweden 9th. However, going into the game, Germany had yet to concede a goal at the 2019 tournament and had not lost to Sweden at a major tournament since 1995.

When Germany took the lead after 16 minutes with a beautifully constructed goal it looked as if it was to be the same old song.

But, Sweden hit back with an equalizer and then took a 2-1 lead early in the second half. It was a lead they would not relinquish.

In terms of predictions, Scandinavian countries, in particular Sweden, have been an Achilles heel for me at this tournament.

Sweden and Norway upset the round of 16 cart as I went 6-2 and Sweden spoiled a clean sweep in the quarterfinals with the win over Germany.

Ironically, if I had to bet the farm on one result from the quarterfinals it would have been Germany to beat Sweden. However, it was no fluke and Sweden were well worth the win.

Watch Sweden vs Netherlands Online

Watch Sweden vs Netherlands Online : The Soccerbot is up 2000 percent and just locked in picks for Wednesday’s Sweden vs Netherlands game. There has been drama and controversy at the 2019 Women’s World Cup but up until the last game in the quarterfinals we hadn’t seen a major upset. Defending European champions the Netherlands play Sweden on Wednesday in Lyon in the second semifinal of the Women’s World Cup.

There has been drama and controversy at the 2019 Women’s World Cup but up until the last game in the quarterfinals we hadn’t seen a major upset.

That changed with Sweden’s 2-1 win over 2nd favorites, Germany. Based on FIFA rankings there may not be all that much between the two countries – Germany 2nd, and Sweden 9th. However, going into the game, Germany had yet to concede a goal at the 2019 tournament and had not lost to Sweden at a major tournament since 1995.

When Germany took the lead after 16 minutes with a beautifully constructed goal it looked as if it was to be the same old song.

But, Sweden hit back with an equalizer and then took a 2-1 lead early in the second half. It was a lead they would not relinquish.

In terms of predictions, Scandinavian countries, in particular Sweden, have been an Achilles heel for me at this tournament.

Sweden and Norway upset the round of 16 cart as I went 6-2 and Sweden spoiled a clean sweep in the quarterfinals with the win over Germany.

Ironically, if I had to bet the farm on one result from the quarterfinals it would have been Germany to beat Sweden. However, it was no fluke and Sweden were well worth the win.

The result provided Sweden with a double celebration. UEFA, as it did in 2015, is using the Women’s World Cup as the qualifying competition for the 2020 Olympics.

The top three European finishers go to Tokyo and joining Sweden are the Netherlands and also the UK through England’s progress to the last four.

Reigning Olympic champions Germany – they beat Sweden in Rio in 2016 – will not get to defend its title and also missing will be France, a quarter finalist in 2016 and a semi finalist four years before in London.

And to the semifinals of this World Cup.

Of the original six groups, three are represented in the semifinals – Group D, England; Group E, Netherlands; Group F, the United States and Sweden.

July 3, Netherlands (8) vs. Sweden (9)

At Parc Olympique Lyonnais, Lyon, capacity 59,186; kick off 15:00 ET

I discounted Sweden’s chances when they qualified for the round of 16. The group stage performance was nothing to get excited about. A win over Thailand was par for the course. Two late goals against Chile was met with relief as much as joy and then there was a 2-0 defeat from the US.

But the Swedes rested half their starting eleven against the US and they knew that by finishing second they would move into the bottom half of the draw, on paper the easier route to the final.

Over the first two rounds of the knock out stage Sweden have visibly grown in confidence buttressed by six players with more than 100 international appearances.

Defensively they are solid with two defensive banks that move in unison. As a last resort there is goalkeeper Hedvig Lindahl who has been as good as any at the tournament.

Kosovare Asllani prompts and teases in midfield while striker Stina Blackstenius uses her strength and quickness intelligently. The speed at which Sweden transition from defense to attack is a feature of their game.

Netherlands Sweden Live

Netherlands Sweden Live : Netherlands takes on Sweden in a semifinal of the 2019 Women’s World Cup with a berth in the finals on the line Wednesday. Netherlands knocked Sweden out of Euro 2017, winning 2-0 in the quarter-finals with goals from Lieke Martens and Vivianne Miedema. The top three European finishers go to Tokyo and joining Sweden are the Netherlands and also the UK through England’s progress to the last …

The Netherlands have opened as the betting favorites for the sixth straight match while Sweden are underdogs for the fourth consecutive game in this World Cup.

Sweden pulled off the biggest outright upset of the tournament to get here with their 2-1 victory over Germany in the quarterfinal. They’re now looking to advance as the underdogs for a third consecutive game.

Other than the Swedes, upsets haven’t been common with underdogs winning just five of 48 matches in regulation (38 by the favorite and five draws).

Netherlands have been one of those favorites continuing to cash as they went undefeated in the group stage and then beat Japan and Italy in the knockout stage. They closed as favorites in every match but were actually available at plus-money in three different games.

It looks like that will be the case once again as they’re currently listed +135 to beat Sweden in regulation.

Oranje line up with their fair share of star players, but have also been propelled by their substitutes making a huge impact in every game. Although the overall squad still hasn’t looked dominating over the course of a 90-minute match, the potential is certainly there.

Sweden are the only team remaining in the World Cup to have suffered a loss/draw, but their 2-0 defeat to USA in the group stage didn’t hurt them at all. It may have even helped, as they were underdogs against Canada in the Round of 16 and then mostly overlooked against Germany in the quarterfinal but still advanced at +200 odds.

Despite facing a 1-0 deficit within 20 minutes on Saturday, they recovered for an impressive 2-1 comeback victory. With momentum gaining as an underdog, the Swedes should attract plenty of public bets over the next few days.

Netherlands and Sweden meet on Wednesday night for a place in the Women’s World Cup Final.

The Oranje – also known as Leeuwinnen (the Lionesses) – are the reigning European champions after beating Denmark in the 2017 final, and have the knockout pedigree to go all the way on the global stage.

As for Sweden, the Blågult (The Blue and Yellow) have not lifted silverware since Euro ’84, but Peter Gerhardsson’s side will be confident of an upset having shocked Germany in the quarters.

Netherlands and Sweden now know that holders USA await in the July 7 final in Lyon following a dramatic 2-1 win over Phil Neville’s Lionesses in Lyon on Tuesday night.

Netherlands made light work of Italy in the quarters, and with both goals in the 2-0 win coming from headers, the Dutch will fancy their chances from a set-piece if this turns into another tight contest.

Sweden shocked Germany with a 2-1 comeback with in the last eight, and the manner in which they held on to withstand a late onslaught may give them momentum in terms of mentality heading into this semi-final.

Still, the presence of Lieke Mertens and in-form Vivianne Miedema should be enough to see the Oranje into the final.

Sweden Netherlands Live

Sweden Netherlands Live : The Netherlands, the reigning European champion, has lived on the edge, though, with three of its five wins coming by a goal. In the other semifinal, it’s the surprising Netherlands taking on a confident Sweden side on Wednesday. Stina Blackstenius scored the go-ahead goal just minutes into the second half, and Sweden surprised Germany with a 2-1 quarterfinal victory in …

Sweden rested seven starters in its final first-round match, basically conceding the group to the United States and dropping into the bottom half of the tournament bracket, where it avoided Spain, France and England. The strategy worked, with Sweden beating Canada and rallying from a one-goal deficit to edge Germany and reach the semifinals for the fourth time. Stina Blackstenius scored the winning goal in both knockout-round games, becoming just the second Swede — and the first since 1991 — to score in consecutive Women’s World Cup knockout-round games.

The loss to the U.S. was the only game in the tournament in which Sweden conceded multiple goals, and it was the only loss any semifinalist brought into the final four. The Netherlands, playing in its second Women’s World Cup, won just one game in its debut visit four years ago.

It has won five times in this tournament with Lieke Martens, a former world player of the year, and Vivianne Miedema combining for three of the team’s four goals in the knockout stages. Miedema’s 61 goals in 80 international matches are the most in Dutch history, male or female. The Netherlands, the reigning European champion, has lived on the edge, though, with three of its five wins coming by a goal. Sweden leads the all-time series between the teams 10-6-5, outscoring the Netherlands 33-17.

The Netherlands have opened as the betting favorites for the sixth straight match while Sweden are underdogs for the fourth consecutive game in this World Cup.

Sweden pulled off the biggest outright upset of the tournament to get here with their 2-1 victory over Germany in the quarterfinal. They’re now looking to advance as the underdogs for a third consecutive game.

Other than the Swedes, upsets haven’t been common with underdogs winning just five of 48 matches in regulation (38 by the favorite and five draws).

Netherlands have been one of those favorites continuing to cash as they went undefeated in the group stage and then beat Japan and Italy in the knockout stage. They closed as favorites in every match but were actually available at plus-money in three different games.

It looks like that will be the case once again as they’re currently listed +135 to beat Sweden in regulation.

Oranje line up with their fair share of star players, but have also been propelled by their substitutes making a huge impact in every game. Although the overall squad still hasn’t looked dominating over the course of a 90-minute match, the potential is certainly there.

Sweden are the only team remaining in the World Cup to have suffered a loss/draw, but their 2-0 defeat to USA in the group stage didn’t hurt them at all. It may have even helped, as they were underdogs against Canada in the Round of 16 and then mostly overlooked against Germany in the quarterfinal but still advanced at +200 odds.

Despite facing a 1-0 deficit within 20 minutes on Saturday, they recovered for an impressive 2-1 comeback victory. With momentum gaining as an underdog, the Swedes should attract plenty of public bets over the next few days.

Netherlands made light work of Italy in the quarters, and with both goals in the 2-0 win coming from headers, the Dutch will fancy their chances from a set-piece if this turns into another tight contest.

Sweden shocked Germany with a 2-1 comeback with in the last eight, and the manner in which they held on to withstand a late onslaught may give them momentum in terms of mentality heading into this semi-final.

Still, the presence of Lieke Mertens and in-form Vivianne Miedema should be enough to see the Oranje into the final.

Netherlands vs Sweden 2019

Netherlands vs Sweden 2019 Live : This is Sweden’s fourth World Cup semi-final – only USA (eight) and Germany (five) have reached more. The Netherlands take on Sweden on Wednesday in the second 2019 Women’s World Cup semifinal. Eight of the Netherlands’ 10 goals at the World Cup have come in the second half. All five of the Netherlands’ wins at the 2019 tournament have come against sides from different confederations.

There has been drama and controversy at the 2019 Women’s World Cup but up until the last game in the quarterfinals we hadn’t seen a major upset.

That changed with Sweden’s 2-1 win over 2nd favorites, Germany. Based on FIFA rankings there may not be all that much between the two countries – Germany 2nd, and Sweden 9th. However, going into the game, Germany had yet to concede a goal at the 2019 tournament and had not lost to Sweden at a major tournament since 1995.

When Germany took the lead after 16 minutes with a beautifully constructed goal it looked as if it was to be the same old song.

But, Sweden hit back with an equalizer and then took a 2-1 lead early in the second half. It was a lead they would not relinquish.

In terms of predictions, Scandinavian countries, in particular Sweden, have been an Achilles heel for me at this tournament.

Sweden and Norway upset the round of 16 cart as I went 6-2 and Sweden spoiled a clean sweep in the quarterfinals with the win over Germany.

Ironically, if I had to bet the farm on one result from the quarterfinals it would have been Germany to beat Sweden. However, it was no fluke and Sweden were well worth the win.

The result provided Sweden with a double celebration. UEFA, as it did in 2015, is using the Women’s World Cup as the qualifying competition for the 2020 Olympics. The top three European finishers go to Tokyo and joining Sweden are the Netherlands and also the UK through England’s progress to the last four.

Reigning Olympic champions Germany – they beat Sweden in Rio in 2016 – will not get to defend its title and also missing will be France, a quarter finalist in 2016 and a semi finalist four years before in London.

And to the semifinals of this World Cup.

Of the original six groups, three are represented in the semifinals – Group D, England; Group E, Netherlands; Group F, the United States and Sweden.

July 3, Netherlands (8) vs. Sweden (9)

At Parc Olympique Lyonnais, Lyon, capacity 59,186; kick off 15:00 ET

I discounted Sweden’s chances when they qualified for the round of 16. The group stage performance was nothing to get excited about. A win over Thailand was par for the course. Two late goals against Chile was met with relief as much as joy and then there was a 2-0 defeat from the US.

But the Swedes rested half their starting eleven against the US and they knew that by finishing second they would move into the bottom half of the draw, on paper the easier route to the final.

Over the first two rounds of the knock out stage Sweden have visibly grown in confidence buttressed by six players with more than 100 international appearances.

Defensively they are solid with two defensive banks that move in unison. As a last resort there is goalkeeper Hedvig Lindahl who has been as good as any at the tournament.

Kosovare Asllani prompts and teases in midfield while striker Stina Blackstenius uses her strength and quickness intelligently. The speed at which Sweden transition from defense to attack is a feature of their game.